Community Service and Learning – Global Homework Experts

Edited for MGT-322. Taken from: The National Intergroup Dialogue Institute | The Program on Intergroup Relations | University of Michigan Adapted by The Ginsberg Center for Community Service and Learning | University of Michigan, 2013 Project 1 Identity Exploration Project – 10 Points Submit electronically to Blackboard Each student will fill out and respond to the questions provided on the Social Identity Profile below. After filling out the chart, write a two-page (double spaced) response addressing the following questions: · Using Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s idea of a “single story” from the video The Danger of a Single Story, choose two different identities from your profile and describe a “single story” about each that you have either learned growing up, seen used towards a group, and/or have been ascribed to you. Focus on your knowledge of stereotypes with each group and relate to the potential impact of those stereotypes on a workplace. · Please share which social identities in the profile stood out to you overall and why they stood out. Are there identities that relate to one another? How do they intersect? · How does filling out the social identity profile impact, shift, and/or relate to the way you think about yourself in the context of managing diversity? Learning Objectives: Ø Students will gain knowledge and understanding of general social categories in contemporary U.S. culture. Ø Students will gain experience in self-reflection to help personally develop a deeper understanding of their social identities and how to relate their personal life to their professional work in Human Resources. Ø Students will explore the complexities of having multiple social identities and the way social identities may relate. Edited for MGT-322. Taken from: The National Intergroup Dialogue Institute | The Program on Intergroup Relations | University of Michigan Adapted by The Ginsberg Center for Community Service and Learning | University of Michigan, 2013 Grading Rubric Excellent paper (A). Student deeply explores and reflects on the identities chosen and does not provide surface responses. Student is able to connect personal experiences with professional goals in managing and leading in diversity, social justice, and multiculturalism. Student is able to make connections across identities and articulate the complexities of intersections. The paper has very little or no grammar or spelling errors. Very good paper (A-). Student deeply explores and reflects on the identities chosen and does not provide surface responses. Student is able to connect personal experiences with professional goals in managing and leading in diversity, social justice, and multiculturalism. Student is unable to make connections across identities and articulate the complexities of intersections. The paper has very little or no grammar or spelling errors. Satisfactory paper (B). Student deeply explores and reflects on the identities chosen but does provide some surface responses. Student is able to connect personal experiences with professional goals in managing and leading in diversity, social justice, and multiculturalism. Student is unable to make connections across identities and articulate the complexities of intersections. The paper has some grammar or spelling errors. Poor participation (C, D). Student completes paper but provides surface responses or only tends to partially respond to questions. The paper lacks flow and has multiple grammar and spelling errors. Unacceptable paper (F). Student fails to turn in paper on time, provides very little or no insight or reflection on the project. The paper has many grammar and spelling errors. Edited for MGT-322. Taken from: The National Intergroup Dialogue Institute | The Program on Intergroup Relations | University of Michigan Adapted by The Ginsberg Center for Community Service and Learning | University of Michigan, 2013 Social Identity Groups Social identity groups are based on the physical, social, and mental characteristics of individuals. They are sometimes obvious and clear, sometimes not obvious and unclear, often self-claimed and frequently ascribed by others. For example, racial groupings are often ascribed as well as self-claimed. Government, schools, and employers often ask an individual to claim a racial identity group or simply ascribe one to an individual based on visual perception. Other social identities are personally claimed but not often announced or easily visually ascribed such as sexual orientation, religion, or disability status. For the purpose of this self-examination please identify the memberships you claim or those ascribed to you. Below are examples of social identity groupings. Examples (Feel free to use your own language for your identities.) Gender Sex Race Woman, Man, Transgender, Gender Non-Conforming Sex Intersex, Female, Male Race Asian Pacific Islander, Native American, [email protected], Black, White, Bi/Multiracial Ethnicity Irish, Chinese, Puerto Rican, Italian, Mohawk, Jewish, Guatemalan, Lebanese, European-American Sexual Orientation Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Pansexual, Heterosexual, Queer, Questioning, Asexual Religion/Spirituality Hindu, Muslim, Buddhist, Jewish, Christian, Pagan, Agnostic, Faith/Meaning Atheist, Secular Humanist Social Class Poor, Working Class, Lower-Middle Class, Upper-Middle Class, Owning Class, Ruling Class Age Child, Young Adult, Middle-Age Adult, Elderly Disability People with disabilities (cognitive, physical, emotional, etc.), Temporarily ablebodied, Temporarily disabled Nation(s) of Origin United States, Nigeria, Korea, Turkey, Argentina and/or Citizenship Tribal or Indigenous Mohawk, Aboriginal, Navajo, Santal Affiliation Body Size/ Type Fat, Person of Size, Thin Target Group: social identity groups that are disenfranchised and exploited Agent Group: social identity groups that hold unearned privileged in societyEdited for MGT-322. Taken from: The National Intergroup Dialogue Institute | The Program on Intergroup Relations | University of Michigan Adapted by The Ginsberg Center for Community Service and Learning | University of Michigan, 2013 Social Identity Profile List the group membership(s) you belong to – see above for examples or feel free to use your own language. Then put a box next to the social identity or identities that reflects your best answer to the statements in the top column. Note: You WILL NOT be handing this section in. This is for your own information and process. Social Identity Group Membership You are most aware of You think about least Have greatest effect on how others see you (positive or negative) Have strongest effect on how you see yourself as a person Have the earliest memories of… Have the most impact on your experience in the community Have the experience of privilege (Agent) Have the experience of marginalization (Target) Gender Sex Race Ethnicity Sexual Orientation Religion/ Spirituality/Faith/ Meaning Social Class Age (Dis)Ability Nation(s) of Origin and/or Citizenship Tribal or Indigenous Affiliation Body size/type Additional Edited for MGT-322. Taken from: The National Intergroup Dialogue Institute | The Program on Intergroup Relations | University of Michigan Adapted by The Ginsberg Center for Community Service and Learning | University of Michigan, 2013 Agent & Target Groups in the U.S. SOCIAL IDENTITY AGENT TARGET Ability Able Bodied Dis(abled) Age 25-55 Children, Youth, Young adults, Aging populations Social Class Middle class, Upper Class “Poor”, poverty, working class Education Status College/Higher Education High School, G.E.D., Middle School, No formal schooling, First Generation College Student Gender Gender Conforming/Cisgender Gender Variant/Gender NonConforming/Transgender National Origin U.S. Born Outside of U.S., First generation, Indigenous Race White/Caucasian People of Color, Multi- racial, Biracial, Trans- racial adoptees Religion/Faith/ Spirituality/Meaning Christianity Judaism, Islam, Paganism, Buddhism, etc. Sex Identity Male Women/Female, Intersex, Transgender Sexual Identity Heterosexual Gay, Lesbian, Bi/Pan/Omnisexual, Asexual, Queer Size Size normative Full size, “Short”, “Fat” Veteran Status Non-Veteran Veteran

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