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Assignment Briefing (Individual Portfolio: Personal and Professional Report (Element 2)

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Module Name Consultancy in Practice
Module Code BS7032
Assignment Title Assessment: Personal and Professional Development
Report (Element 2)
Type of Submission 20% of module grade
Weighting of the assignment in the
overall module grade
Individual submission
Word Count/Time allocation (for
presentations)
1,500 words
Issue Date 01/03/2022
Submission Date 19th of September, 2022; 5 p.m. British Standard Time
Date of Feedback to Students Within 20 working days after submission deadline
Where feedback can be found In Canvas: includes brief comments on the script and
annotated rubric.

 

Employability skills
Professional Creative Thoughtful Resilient Proactive
Literacy Communication Critical
Thinking
Soft skills Adaptability
Teamwork Storytelling Critical
Writing
Project
Management
Creativity
Problem
Solving

 

How these skills are being developed in this assessment
You will self-reflect on your personal professional development through working on the
Consultancy in Practice Project and beyond.
Assignment Task
Personal and professional development final report is part of the assessment for Consultancy in
Practice. It is an individual written assignment (1,500 words) and counts for 20% of your overall
mark.
Background/Context
This is a 1,500-word document that details how you approached the identified problem and issues
encountered during your consultancy project and outcomes which emerged from the project.
As such, the PPD final report:
1. may be written in the first or third person
2. identifies the steps taken to identify, reflect upon and address the problem you consulted
3. indicates how the literature informed the process
4. provides results and conclusions drawn from the process
5. addresses a plan for action and for being a change agent in your professional
practice
6. most importantly, provides both a narrative of the whole project and the iterative process of
engaging with the identified problem and your client.
Assessment
To achieve a minimum pass on this report, you must provide an acceptable discussion of the
background and aims about the identified problem for your client, relevant literature, steps taken to
address the problem, results and conclusion, and reflection on your experience during the
consultancy project.
To achieve a pass, it is imperative that you demonstrate full engagement with your consultancy
project, team and client.
Suggested Structure of the Report
Introduction. This should briefly outline the aims of the report. Sufficient background information
you provide about the problem should enable the reader to understand the nature of the problem
you worked on for your client.
Steps taken to address the problem. This should focus strongly on the contribution made by you
to your team and the contribution of the team, to your thinking and action/engagement with the
problem.
Critical review of the literature. This should provide a critical evaluation of the key pieces of
literature which are relevant to the problem and you as scholar-consultant.

 

Results and conclusions. An aggregation, summary or other presentation of results
should be provided, and conclusions drawn from the results set out, and a plan of action for the
next steps you have suggested to your client should be included.
Reflection on your experience and looking forward. This is your chance to reflect upon your
interactions with your team and client, and how you can improve your work in the future, based on
this experience. Note any actions you want to take to prepare for your career. So, crucially, you
need to consider the connection between what you learn and change for yourself, and how you
help others learn and change. You need to take responsibility for both processes and as a
consultant. As scholarly practitioners, you want to show an ability to understand your thinking and
how this affects what you do (this skill is often referred to as metacognition).
Remember: “Managers unable to command change in themselves cannot constructively change
the conditions in which they command others” (Revans, 1982, p.545).
Additional resources
You might also find it helpful to look at some published PPD accounts of practice. Here are some
suggested ones:
Felix, E. & Keevil, J. (2008) ‘Action learning in the BBC’. Action Learning:
Research & Practice, 5 (3), November, pp. 239-248.
Ropponen, T. (2008) ‘The Nokia story of action learning’, Action Learning:
Research & Practice, 5 (2), July, pp.161-165.
Spencer, C. (2005) ‘Action learning in John Lewis’, Action Learning: Research & Practice, 2 (2),
September, pp. 189-195.

 

Allocation of marks
Section/element Allocated Marks
Overall writing and clarity of ideas 10%
Description of the Organisation and the Business Context and Problem 20%
Reflection on the consultancy experience and looking forward 30%
Engaging with the literature 25%
Referencing 15%
Total 100%

 

 

Allocated Marks
Overall writing and clarity of ideas
This criterion is linked to the quality of the report, including
structure, readability and presentation.
We are not in the business of correcting grammar and spelling,
and there are ample tools in Word to help anyone improve
grammar, so there are few excuses for poor grammar, for
example, any failings in the following:
• Logical structure/sequence
• Clarity/written style
• Correct grammar/spelling/referencing
• Proper business report style (page nos; table of contents; sub
headings etc.)
• Effective executive summary – no more than one page – which
summarises the report, its main findings and its findings
• Good/well-presented charts/diagrams and other illustrations
10%

 

Distinctive (70% and above) performance. Excellent written
report containing executive summary, appropriate structure,
writing style, referenced sources, tables and graphs.
Meritorious (60-69%) performance. Written report containing
executive summary, fair structure, writing style, referenced
sources, tables and graphs.
Satisfactory (50-59%) performance. Your written report contains
executive summary, but its structure is problematic and has not
closely followed the assignment guidelines.
Poor (50% and below) performance. Your written report contains
a poor executive summary, inappropriate structure, writing style
and referenced sources.
Description of the Organisation and the Business Context
and Problem
Coverage of company background and business context to
include:
• brief description of the organisation, including their services,
offers etc.
• business background, including market share (if appropriate),
nature of customers/clients/service users, competitors (if
appropriate), social, economic and political background etc.
• organisational strategy, including such things as plans for future
growth, product/service and market diversification, meeting
increasing demand
• an overview of the problem you have addressed during your
consultancy project.
Distinctive (70% and above) performance.
You provided a very clear rationale and excellent explanation of
how and why the development objective discussed in the report
was chosen, and its relevance to your professional career
development.
Meritorious (60-69%) performance. You provided a clear
rationale and a very good explanation of how and why the
development objective discussed in the report was chosen, and
its relevance to your professional career.
Satisfactory (50-59%) performance. You provided a fair rationale
and some explanation of how and why the development objective
discussed in the report was chosen, and its relevance to your
professional career development.
20%

 

Poor (50% and below) performance. You provided a poor
rationale and explanation of how and why the development
objective discussed in the report was chosen, and its relevance to
your professional career development.
Reflection on the consultancy experience and looking
forward.
You want to reflect upon your interactions with your team and
client, and how you can improve your work in the future, based on
this experience. Note any actions you want to take to prepare for
your career. So, crucially, you need to consider the connection
between what you learn and change for yourself, and how you
help others learn and change. You need to take responsibility for
both processes and as a consultant. As scholarly practitioners,
you want to show an ability to understand your thinking and how
this affects what you do (this skill is often referred to as
metacognition).
30%
Distinctive (70% and above) performance.
Excellent critical analysis and reflection of how your thinking and
behaviour have changed as a result of your development, by
selecting, referencing and applying relevant theories, giving
examples.
Meritorious (60-69%) performance.
You provided a good critical analysis and reflection of how your
thinking and behaviour have changed as a result of your
development, by selecting, referencing and applying relevant
theories, giving examples.
Satisfactory (50-59%) performance.
Satisfactory critical analysis and reflection of how your thinking
and behaviour have changed as a result of your development.
Problematic application of relevant theories is very limited.
Poor (50% and below) performance. Poor critical analysis and
reflection of how your thinking and behaviour have changed as a
result of your development. Problematic referencing and this
application of relevant theories is very limited.
Engaging with the literature
The critical literature review is related to your reflection when
researching/helping your client. The idea is that you use literature
(the literature is the aggregated evidence from the business world
25%

 

published by academics) to inform your reflections, and/or your
way of thinking in the future. So, for example, you may have
realised that active listening has helped your team (or client) to
overcome the personal conflicts as they arise. You then may want
to consult the literature to understand why listening (in the context
of teamwork or business consultancy) is important. Is it important
because it provides psychological safety? Or does it bring
collective understanding in a team? Or both?
You don’t necessarily need a separate section for the literature
review, but rather, you want that research to inform your
understanding of what’s been going on during your consultancy
project when it comes to people and challenges you worked on.
One thing to keep in mind is that you want to use recent literature
(preferably no more than 10 years old). The reason is that our
understanding in research is constantly evolving. While some of
the principles have remained the same over the past few
decades, the details and the way we are making sense of those
principles are constantly improving.
Distinctive (70% and above) performance. Excellent – a
detailed, structured, specific and achievable literature review.
Meritorious (60-69%) performance. Very good – a detailed,
structured, specific and achievable literature review.
Satisfactory (50-59%) performance. Satisfactory reviewing of the
literature but not really detailed.
Poor (50% and below) performance. Very poor reviewing of the
literature.

 

Referencing
Information is cited correctly.
A high similarity score may be an indication of plagiarism. Read
your report carefully to see the similarities in the text.
For referencing guidelines please see the following resources:
https://canvas.kingston.ac.uk/courses/768/pages/fbss-business
and-management-citing-and-referencing
Basic principles: in-text citations
Each item you quote from or refer to needs to have a citation and
a reference. The citation goes in your assignment text at the point
where you mention it, and the reference goes in an alphabetical
list at the end of your assignment and contains the full details of
the item.
Citations contain only the author’s surname(s), the year of
publication and the page number where you found the
information. There are a number of ways you can cite information
in your work. You can use a direct quote, copying the words
exactly from the book. If you are quoting, you must put quotation
marks at the start and finish of the text you have copied. Here is
an example of a direct quote:
“Once a group has become fully developed and created
cohesiveness, it is more difficult for the manager successfully to
change the attitudes and behaviour of the group” (Mullins, 2016,
p.284).
The other way to cite information in your work is to paraphrase it,
taking an author’s idea and rephrasing it in your own words. This
is often done to condense longer sections of information.
15%

 

Distinctive (70% and above) performance. Excellent written
report containing appropriate structure, writing style, referenced
sources, tables and graphs citation.
Meritorious (60-69%) performance. Good structure, writing style,
tables and graphs citation, and referenced sources.
Satisfactory (50-59%) performance. Satisfactory in-text citations
and references in the report containing proper style, but its
structure is problematic and has not closely followed the
guidelines.
Poor (50% and below) performance.
Very poor in-text citation and reference in the report containing a
poor executive style, inappropriate structure, writing style,
referenced sources.
Total marks 100

FEEDBACK ON THE WRITTEN ELEMENTS OF THE MODULE WILL BE BASED ON POSTGRADUATE GRADE CRITERIA:

CLASS % GRADE OVERALL
DESCRIPTION
GUIDELINE GRADE DESCRIPTIONS
Distinction 85-
100
A+ Outstanding Your work is of an exceptionally high standard which has the potential for submission for
publication in a peer reviewed journal or equivalent.
75-
84
A Excellent Your work demonstrates a sophisticated and comprehensive knowledge of the subject
area. You have shown an exceptional ability in the appropriate use of the relevant
literature, theory, methodologies, practices or tools to analyse and synthesise at Masters
level. Your work is well-constructed and demonstrates a professional approach to academic
practice (citation and referencing; appropriate presentation format; clear, accurate
English). It addresses the learning outcomes/assessment criteria fully.
70-
74
A- Very Good Your work demonstrates strong knowledge of the subject area and the ability to develop an
independent and sophisticated argument or evaluation. The ideas you put forward
demonstrate exceptional clarity and focus and your work adheres to the principles of good
academic practice (citation and referencing; appropriate presentation format; clear,
accurate English). It addresses the learning outcomes/assessment criteria fully.
Merit 67-
69
B+ Good Your work demonstrates a well-developed critical and comprehensive understanding of the
topic. It shows evidence that you have thoroughly researched the topic(s) and are able to
construct an independent, logical argument or evaluation. Your work demonstrates a high
degree of ability in the appropriate use of relevant literature, theory, methodologies,
practices or tools to analyse and synthesise at Masters level. Your work is well-structured
and logically written and demonstrates good academic practice (citation and referencing;
appropriate presentation format; clear, accurate English). There is a good attempt to
address the learning outcomes/assessment criteria, meeting all of them to some extent
and some of them well.
64-
66
B
60-
63
B
Pass 57-
59
C+ Satisfactory Your work demonstrates knowledge of the subject area and the ability to develop an
independent, logical argument or evaluation. It shows competence in the appropriate use
of literature, theory, methodologies, practices or tools. The development of some ideas in
your work is limited but it attempts to analyse materials critically. At times the expression
and structure of your work is not clear and you have not consistently followed good
academic practice (citation and referencing; presentation format; clear, accurate English).
Your work provides some level of response to the learning outcomes/assessment criteria
but does not fully address all of the criteria.
54-
56
C
50-
53
C
Marginal
Fail
45-
49
MF Unsatisfactory Your work contains some weaknesses. It provides some evidence that you have
understood the topic and that you are able structure arguments or evaluation. Your work
demonstrates some ability in the appropriate use of literature, theory, methodologies,
practices or tools but not at Masters level. Your work fails to address one or more criteria
fully.
Fail 35-
44
F Poor Your work is unsatisfactory in it demonstrates very limited knowledge of the subject area
and does not succeed in grasping the key issues There is little evidence of development of
ideas and critical analysis is very limited. The presentation is confused and lacks coherence.
Your work does not meet the learning outcomes/assessment criteria.
0-
35
Very poor Your work demonstrates no real knowledge of the subject area and does not display the
critical ability required at this level. Your work does not attempt to address the learning
outcomes/assessment criteria adequately.

 

Avoiding plagiarism
When you write an essay, report or dissertation you should always cite the published sources to which you
quote, refer to or use as evidence, otherwise you are likely to be committing plagiarism, which is a form of
academic misconduct with potentially very serious consequences. References need to be made both within
the text and in a list at the end.
The aim in doing this is to ensure that somebody reading your work can easily find these sources for
themselves. This applies to whether you are using a book, a report, a journal article or an Internet site. You will
probably know from your own experience how much easier it is to find a reference when a reading list or
bibliography is clear and unambiguous.There is help available from the library and online, including a range of
videos such as those given below:
https://mykingston.kingston.ac.uk/library/help_and_training/Pages/referencing.aspx.
http://www.citethemrightonline.com/basics
Do remember you can submit your work as many times as you like before the final deadline. It is a good idea
to check your Originality Report and ensure that any potential plagiarism is eradicated for your work by
rewriting in your own words and referencing correctly. The staff on the BLASC desk in the LRC will be able to
advise on this and on all aspects of academic writing.
The best way to avoid academic misconduct or plagiarism is to use your own words at all times; do not cut
and paste from other work.
Illness or other mitigating circumstances
By submitting an assignment you are declaring yourself fit to take the assessment therefore please make sure
that if you are unwell you understand our mitigating circumstances process. The most important thing to do is
keep us informed if you are experiencing problems! See our regulations on this link:
http://www.kingston.ac.uk/aboutkingstonuniversity/howtheuniversityworks/policiesandregulations
Group work and academic misconduct
Work submitted by a group is the responsibility of the group as a whole. In the unfortunate event of the work
being judged to have been plagiarised, the only circumstance in which it is possible that the responsibility for
the misconduct would only fall on the group member who actually committed it, would be if there were clear
evidence that that member had dishonestly misled the rest of the group as to the source of his her
contribution. This would require clear and contemporaneous evidence of group discussions of the sort which
should be available if groups follow the advice given about keeping a log of group proceedings. If the group
work is simply allocated amongst the members of the group without any sort of group review of the outcomes,
then all the group members are taking on themselves the risk that some element of the work is tainted by
academic misconduct. If you are unclear about any of this, you should refer to the University’s guide to
Plagiarism for further explanation.

 

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